Wednesday, November 10, 2010

View-Master Wolf Man

Now before you get too excited about an AEET View-Master post, please know up front that I tried my hardest to actually scan and photograph the VM reels. Unfortunately, this is beyond my scope of scanner / photography knowledge and understanding. (I've seen the View-Master Frankenstein posts at a few other fine horror blogs and have no clue how they did it.) Anyway, as a planned Halloween post last month, I already had the Wolf Man cover and booklet pages scanned... I suppose there's no need to just delete them, the booklet itself not only tells the scary classic tale featured on the reels, it also includes some fun werewolf art and games. And just maybe this VM teaser will entice you to go out and hunt down the reels yourself.











Talking View-Master version of Dracula.

11 comments:

staticfraction said...

awesome post. thanks fer sharing

Spectergirl said...

I must find these!

Karswell said...

Of the 3 major monster View-Master sets (Dracula, Wolf Man and Frankenstein) I actually think Dracula is the best. The sculpted characters and miniature sets are amazingly creepy and dripping with gloomy atmosphere. Frankenstien has been covered pretty thoroughly on many other blogs, as mentioned, just google those words and you will see what I mean. The Wolf Man is actually the worst of the three, it doesn't seem like they put as much imagination into the visual 3D storytelling as they did with Dracula (plus the werewolf is kind of safe and not so scary.)

I spent alot of time trying to capture the images from the reels but seriously can't get anything good in return except for red blurry blobs. I'll try again, maybe someday down the road I'll update this post. If anyone has any tips / pointers on getting good results please drop me a line. Thanks!

Mr. Cavin said...

I used to scan slides at my old job, but that required specific technology--a carousel that positioned the slide in front of a lens and mirror, concentrating the light through the positive and making a new focal projection. So even that would not have worked on a View-Master disk, where the film positives are something smaller than 110 even.

My guess is the only real effective way to get a photograph from one of these slides is to use an actual enlarger in an actual dark room. It wouldn't cost you any money to call a professional lab and see if that's possible (though I imagine it might be a little spendy to do them all).

But I'd love to see you manage this some way. If I recall correctly, View-Master works like a stereoscope, and I've seen two-image animated gifs really bring out the that fake-looking planar three-D to maximum effect. Like here. Love to see that done with these badass monster View-Master slides.

Karswell said...

Thanks Mr C! In the meantime, anyone interested in seeing the Frankenstein View-Master images can find them here:

http://wonderfulwonderblog.blogspot.com/2008/03/frankenstein-view-master-part-ii.html

Anonymous said...

WOW I TOTALLY DIDNT EVEN KNOW THERE WERE MONSTER VIEWMASTERS! I HAD A DINOSAUR ONE BUT THAT WAS ABOUT IT,EVERYTHING ELSE WAS BUGS BUNNY AND DISNEY STUFF

Lori said...

holy bananas!!!! those are fantastic!!! want, need!

Karswell said...

>TOTALLY DIDNT EVEN KNOW THERE WERE MONSTER VIEWMASTERS!

There's other fun spooky ones too like The Munsters, Dark Shadows... even Casper's Ghostland is creepy and cool.

>holy bananas!!!! those are fantastic!!! want, need!

How is it possible that you don't already have these, Lori?!! We should give Tom and his Super 8 a rest one of these days and have View-Master Projector Night...

NEXT: DONUTS!!!!

KW said...

You find some of the best stuff in the world

Anonymous said...

The Wolf is a symbol of the indian.
How a wolf lived and became a wolfman when we landed on the moon or man became one then is not relevant.
All that matters is that the story be known to the world.

Mr. Cavin said...

Hm. I'm pretty sure the wolf is an animal that lives all over the world. Stories of wolves are cultural, and they are written by every society I can think of. How that wolf became a man is a story about how we fear for our children, and how, at various times in our psychological evolution, we explained away things like physical and mental disease. Also about how we scorn the very idea of retrograde evolution.