Friday, October 10, 2014

How to Ward Off Vampires

Just when you thought you knew all the ways to slay or waylay a vampire-- from the November 1974 issue of Dracula Lives! #9 -- and hey, wanna see a sexy, full-length Frank Robbins vampire classic from this issue? Try clicking HERE! to be transported via leathery wings to my other blog...



7 comments:

Karswell said...

From the November 1974 issue of Dracula Lives! #9

Mestiere said...

Ernie Chan of Conan fame! Or Chua, like he was apparently still signing his name.

There are vampires in every culture in the world, in all inhabited continents and for thousands of years. They are usually a demon, revenant or even a deity who feeds on blood. Ancient gods were always asking for blood sacrifices, even old Yahweh. It's one of those really consistent themes—like ghosts and elf-like creatures—which are invariably found in all cultures. And dragons, inexplicably found even in cultures without reptiles, like the Arctic. I wonder why that is?

Mr. Cavin said...

I love these. They are, ah, somewhat fast and loose with traditions--but then again, traditions are a moving target, after all. I always loved the thing with grains of sand (related, I think, to the thing about making knots the vampire will have to untie before it can attack), because the trope so amiably attaches the stigma of paranormal suspicion to symptoms of widely recognized developmental and psychological disorders. Autism? Obsessive compulsion? You know, alongside anemia, allergies, dementia, and lividity, and rigor, and the weird ways of decomposition: With close enough reading it's possible to appreciate this stew of human complaints and burial practices that coalesced into the mythology we've syncretized today.

Lots of cultures tied the feet of their corpses together throughout the ages, so it makes sense the practice would also find its way into this recipe. Probably it's where Chinese hopping vampires come from, too.

Craftypants Carol said...

those grain counting rubes are totally fooling themselves

Mr. Cavin said...

I just read a story last night--after reading this--that mentioned the practice of filling a corpse's mouth with stones and garlic to prevent its return from the grave. I assume that's equal parts immobilizing the mouth with inedible, teeth-destroying matter and weighting the head down enough to effectively pinion it to the bottom of the coffin. Clever villagers.

Karswell said...

and this just in:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/bulgaria/11153923/Vampire-grave-found-in-Bulgaria.html

Mr. Cavin said...

Fantastic catch! These people were not kidding around, were they? They transfixed the guy like a specimen and then removed one of his legs to boot. Some vampires just can't catch a break.