Sunday, June 24, 2012

Rocky and his Fiendish Friends #5 (PART 1)

In our last post, I presented a couple kookball tales from the September 1963 issue of Rocky and his Fiendish Friends #5, and now by popular, arm-twisting demand here's the start of a two-part post delivering the rest of this great issue-- and what a collection of top notch Jay Ward characters we have here too: Bullwinkle, Rocky, Mr. Peabody and Sherman, Boris and Natasha, Inspector Fenwick, Dudley Do-Right, Snidely Whiplash, Sweet Nell and Horse! I already applauded the wild artistry of Al Kilgore on these stories, let's not overlook his extremely funny, super clever writing either!






























(Part 2 up NEXT!)

9 comments:

Jeff Overturf said...

Awe-inspiring stuff! Thanks!

Drazen said...

YAY! You've done it again!

Karswell said...

Ewwps! I dewd it aginz...

Mr. Cavin said...

Looks beautiful! I'm going to save reading it till part two is up (and because I'll have more time in a couple days). But from the cursory examination I gave it while scrolling down to the comment button, it looks like it's going to be wonderful. I really, really dig this style of making comics, using color rather than lines for the panel borders.

Karswell said...

That's cool, they're all individual stories that can be read on their own and not connected in any way. I'll see if I can find more Kilgore examples for future posts too... thanks for the comments!

Mykal Banta said...

Outstanding stuff. Like Mr. Cavin, I think the page design very appealing here. Those "border-less panels" were a Gold Key trademark. I still think these title was one of their best "bigfoot" cartooning efforts. As you say, the writing really captured the superior TV show well.

Karswell said...

Bigfoot?

Mykal Banta said...

It's a old school expression describing a kind of cartoonist and cartooning. It comes from the way the character design has over sized feet and hands, thus "bigfoot." - Mickey Mouse (character) and Floyd Gottfredson (cartoonist) for example. Felix the Cat and Otto Messmer is another example of the style and the cartoonist. Today, the style today is often called "Cartoony," which is a term I've never been able to get behind. It's like defining the color blue as "bluey" to me.

Karswell said...

Gotcha!

PART TWO is now up as well, enjoy!