Sunday, January 19, 2014

60's Sunbeam

Back in November we looked at some super Sunfrost Therm-O-Ware (click HERE), now two wintery months later let's continue warming up in the glorious 60's design glow of this sensational Sunbeam appliance brochure. Highlighting just a few select categories of their extensive product service line, this simple fold-out features top notch illustration style and color. I would love to own either of the clocks at the top of image 3, and of course the electric razor at the top of image 2.






13 comments:

Craftypants Carol said...

that clock at the very top is insane!

i love the groovy toaster too! really neat illustrations!

Karswell said...

Just like with the Sunfrost booklet, I got lucky after finding this one tucked inside a different, larger booklet I bought! SCORE!! Oh ya-yuh!!

Craftypants Carol said...

yeah i freaking love it when that happens :)

JMR777 said...

I didn't know they made electric snow throwers back then.

I'm always learning something new from your blogs, Karswell.
Thank you.

Karswell said...

Yay! I was actually going to mention that in my wintery intro but forgot... it looks deliciously dangerous

Mr. Cavin said...

Okay, what's that other thing on the side of that electric can opener combo? I grew up with two sets of grandparents, and each had an electric can opener similar to that one (both probably Osters, judging by my memory of them being Green Slime green and not awesome Sunbeam teal). The magnet holds the can as the user punctures it by pushing on the chrome handle; then, once the user's dainty, housewifely hands are safely removed, the motor spins the can against its rotary blade--rrrrrrrggg--and the top comes right off. I remember them being hard as hell to clean. But I don't remember either of my grandparents' versions having that extra part on the side, and I can't seem to find an example online. Is it for sealing bags? Making sno-cones?

Karswell said...

It's for removal of dainty housewife hands, Mr C

Mr. Cavin said...

Oooh. Then I'll bet that bucket, dare I say it, turns out to be pretty damn handy after all.

JMR777 said...

Concerning the snow thrower-

I had a snow thrower that worked on electricity, the danger wasn't so much electrocution (since the plug was well away from the ground and wouldn't come in contact with anything wet)
but with my new snow thrower the blades were plastic. In the picture the blades appear to be metal, like a giant push lawn mower that handles snow instead of grass. (The can opener removes the housewife's hands, the snow thrower monstrosity removes the husband's hands, so everybody ends up with stumps...)

On my snow thrower was listed in big bold letters "Unplug the Snow thrower before clearing snow or ice from the blades."

I have no idea how many emergency room visits were needed concerning the plugged in/didn't disconnect the spark plug snow thrower victims/Darwin award nominees, but I can guess they were the reason for the huge warning labels put on snow throwers.
(I always made sure the snow thrower was unplugged before I cleared away the snow, ice and slush, I didn't want to give my health insurance company a reason to cancel my policy. Besides, it would be kind of hard to type replies to a blog with only bloody stumps.)

Karswell said...

Haha, thanks for sharing JMR... I went to high school with a guy who only had half a foot cuz he ran over it (do I need to say accidentally) and it was always unnerving to see in swim class.

Karswell said...

"with a lawn mower" I meant to say

veg-o-matic said...

Mr. Cavin that part on the side of the can opener is an ice crusher. Sunbeam made a far cooler device--Google Joe the Barman.

Mr. Cavin said...

Excellent! And so I was pretty close with sno-cone maker, after all. But what an odd combo, can opener and ice crusher. It's as weird as putting a camera on, I don't know, a telephone. I wonder what meeting brought that one about? I know it's probably for the tiki bar, but I want nothing more than to discover it's really all about Sunbeam's creative team trying to invent an appliance specifically to make summertime snowcream more convenient.